1. All Published Medical Studies of Dr Lam’s Tai Chi for Health Programs

For a pdf version of this list, please visit this link

1.     Lam P. New horizons…developing tai chi for health care. Journal of Australian Family Physician. 1998 Jan-Feb;27(1-2):100-1.

2.     Lam, P. (2004). “Tai Chi for ageing and its associated chronic conditions.” Journal of Aging and Physical Activity 12(3): 347-347.

3.     Song, Lee E, Lam P, Bae S. Effects of Tai Chi exercise on pain, balance, muscle strength, and physical functioning in older women with osteoarthritis: A randomized clinical trial. Journal of Rheumatology. Sept 2003. 30:9 page 2039-2044.

4.     Lam P and Stephenson A. Tai Chi for Back Pain: Rationale and Available Evidence Supporting Tai Chi as a Complementary Treatment. Journal Medical Paradigm. August 2004 page 5-12 (journal no longer in publication)

5.     CHOI J .H. , MOON J . S. & SONG R. Effects of Sun-style Tai Chi exercise on physical fitness and fall prevention in fall prone older adults. Journal of Advanced Nursing 2005, 51(2),150–157

6.     Orr R, Tsang T, Lam P, Comino E, Fiatarone M. Mobility Impairment in Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Care. Volume 29, Number 9, Sept 2006. page 2120-2122

7.     Fransen M, Nairn L, Winstanley J, Lam P,  Edmonds J.  A Randomized Control Trial Of 200 Subjects Comparing Tai Chi, Hydrotherapy And Control, To Measure Improvement In Pain, Physical Function, Muscular Strength And Walking Capacity. Arthritis Care and Research.. Vol.57, No.3, April 15, 2007, pp407-414.

8.     Alexander Voukelatos, MA (Psychol), Robert G. Cumming, PhD, Stephen R. Lord, DSc,and Chris Rissel, PhD. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of tai chi for the Prevention of Falls: The Central Sydney tai chi Trial. JAGS 55:1185–1191, 2007

9.     Tsang T, Orr R, Lam P, Comino E, Fiatarone M. Health benefits of Tai Chi for older patients with Type 2 diabetes: The “Move It for Diabetes Study” – A randomized controlled trial. Clinical Interventions in Aging 2007:2(3) 429-439

10.  Paul Lam, Sarah M Dennis, Terry H Diamond, Nicholas Zwar. Improving Glycaemic and BP control in type 2 diabetes The effectiveness of Tai Chi. Australian Family Physician Vol. 37, No. 10, October 2008 P884-887

11.  Lam P Tai Chi for fall prevention.  NZ Family Physician Journal.  June 2006 volume 33 number 3 page 202

12.  Song, R., Lee, E. O., Lam, P., & Bae. S. C. (2007). Effects of a Sun-style Tai Chi exercise on arthritic symptoms, motivation and the performance of health behaviors in women with osteoarthritis. Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing (English), 37(2), 249-256.

13.  Song, R. Lee, E. O., Bae, S. C., Ahn, Y. H., Paul Lam, Lee, I. O. (2007). Effects of Tai Chi Self-help program on glucose control, cardiovascular risks, and quality of life in type II diabetic patients. Journal of Muscle and Joint Health, 14(1), 13-25.

14.  E Lee, Aeyong Eom, Rhayun Song, Young Ran Chae. Factors Influencing Quality of Life in Patients with Gastrointestinal Neoplasms. Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing. 2008 ISSN 1598-2874 Vol(Ed.) 38(5)

15.  M Lee, Paul Lam, E Ernst. Effectiveness of tai chi for Parkinson’s disease: A critical review. Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, Pages 589-594, ISSN 1353-8020, Vol(Ed.) 14(8, 2008)

16.  Ching-Huey Chen, Miaofen Yen, Susan Fetzer, Li-Hua Lo, Paul Lam. The Effects of Tai Chi Exercise on Elders with Osteoarthritis: A Longitudinal Study, Asian Nursing Research December 2008 Vol 2 No 4

17.  Stephanie S. Y. Au-Yeung, PhD, Christina W. Y. Hui-Chan, PhD, and Jervis C. S. Tang, MSW. Short-form Tai Chi Improves Standing Balance of People With Chronic Stroke. Neurorehabil Neural Repair Online First, published on January 7, 2009

18.  Song, R., Lee, E. O., Lam, P., Bae, S. C. (2009). Effects of Tai Chi or Self-help Program on Balance, Flexibility, Oxygen Consumption, and Muscle Strength in Women with Osteoarthritis. Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamental Nursing, 16(1), 30-38.

19.  Song, R., Eom, A., Lee, E. O., Lam, P․ & Bae, S-C. (2009).  Effects of Tai Chi combined with Self-help Program on Arthritic Symptoms and Fear of Falling in Women with Osteoarthritis.  Journal of Muscle and Joint Health, 16(1), 46-54.

20.  Amanda M Hall, Chris G Maher, Jane Latimer, Manuela L Ferreira and Paul Lam. A randomized controlled trial of tai chi for long-term low back pain (TAI CHI): Study rationale, design, and methods. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 2009, 10:55 (28 May 2009).

21.  Rhayun Song, Sukhee Ahn, Beverly L Roberts, Eun Ok Lee, and You Hern Ahn. Adhering to a Tai Chi program to improve glucose control and quality of life for individuals with type 2 diabetes. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 15(6), 2009, 627-632.

22.  Eun Ok Lee, Young Ran Chae, Rhayun Song, Aeyong Eom, Paul Lam, and Margaret Heitkemper. Feasibility and Effects of a Tai Chi Self-Help Education Program for Korean Gastric Cancer Survivors, Oncology Nursing Forum • Vol. 37, No. 1, January 2010

23.  Rhayun Song, Beverly L. Roberts, Eun-Ok Lee, Paul Lam, Sang-Cheol Bae. A Randomized Study of the Effects of T’ai Chi on Muscle Strength, Bone Mineral Density, and Fear of Falling in Women with Osteoarthritis. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Volume 16, Number 2, 2010, pp. 1–7

24.  Michelle DiGiacomo, Paul Lam, Beverly L. Roberts, Tang Ching Lau, Rhayun Song, Patricia M. Davidson. Exploring the Reasons for Adherence to T’ai Chi Practice. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. December 2010, 16(12): 1245-1246.

25.  Amanda M. Hall, Chris G. Maher, Paul Lam, Manuela Ferreira, Jane Latimer. Tai Chi Exercise for Treatment of Pain and Disability in People With Persistent Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Arthritis Care & Research. Vol. 63, No. 11, November 2011, pp 1576–1583

26.  Hyung Kyoung Oh, Sukhee Ahn, Rhayun Song. Comparing effects of Tai Chi exercise on pain, activities of daily living, and fear of falling in women with Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid arthritis. Journal of Muscle and Joint Health, 18(2), 2011, 137-146.

27.  Hua Ren,Veronica Collins, Sandy J. Clarke, Jin-Song Han, Paul Lam, Fiona Clay, Lara M.Williamson, K. H. Andy Choo. Epigenetic Changes in Response to Tai Chi Practice: A Pilot Investigation of DNA Methylation Marks. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Volume March 2012, Article ID 841810, 9 pages.

28.  Sukhee Ahn, Rhayun Song. Effects of Tai Chi exercise on glucose control, neuropathy scores, balance, and quality of life in patients with Type 2 diabetes and Neuropathy. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 18(12), 2012, 1172-1178.

29.  Rhayun Song, Moonkyoung Park, Jin Ok Chung, Jae Hyung Park, In Whan Sung. Effects of Tai chi exercises on Cardiovascular Risks, Recurrence Risk, and Quality of life in Patients with coronary artery disease. Korean Journal of Adult Nursing, 25(5), 2013, 516-527.

30.  Pao-Feng Tsai, RN, PhD, Jason Y. Chang, PhD, Cornelia Beck, RN, PhD, FAAN,Yong-Fang Kuo, PhD, and Francis J. Keefe, PhD. A Pilot Cluster-Randomized Trial of a 20-Week Tai Chi Program in Elders With Cognitive Impairment and osteoarthritic Knee: Effects on Pain and Other Health Outcomes. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management Vol. 45 No. 4 April 2013

31.  Moonkyoung Park, Rhayun Song. Effects of Tai Chi on fall risk factors: a Meta analysis. Journal of Korean Academic Nursing, 43(3), 2013, 341-351.

32.  Regina Wai Man Leung, Zoe J. McKeough, Matthew J. Peters and Jennifer A. Alison. Short-form Sun-style t’ai chi as an exercise training modality in people with COPD. Eur Respir J 2013; 41: 1051–1057

33.  Beverly Roberts, Rhayun Song, Sukhee Ahn, Paul Lam. Research Metholodogies for Tai Chi research. Edited by mark langweiler, Research methodology for Complementary and alternative therapy. 2015.

34.  Rhayun Song, Sukhee Ahn, Heeyoung So, Eun-hyun Lee, Younghae Chung, Moonkyoung Park. Effects of Tai Chi on balance: A population based meta analysis, The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine 21(3) 2015, 141-151.

35.  Leigh F. Callahan, Rebecca J. Cleveland, Mary Altpeter, and Betsy Hackney. Evaluation of Tai Chi Program Effectiveness for People with Arthritis in the Community: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 2016, 24, 101 -110


The First Tai Chi for Back Pain Study

The First Tai Chi for Back Pain Study conducted in Sydney 2008-2010, Using Dr Paul Lam’s Tai Chi for Back Pain Program

Summary of a Randomized Controlled Trail (RCT) Using “Tai Chi Exercise for the Treatment of Pain and Disability in People with Persistent Low Back Pain”
By: Anastasia Yianni & Wilfred Kwok

Authors of the study: A. M. Hall, C. G. Maher, P. Lam, M. Ferreira and J. Latimer

Published in the Arthritis Care & Research Journal November 2011 

The study consisted of 160 volunteers between ages 18 and 70 years deemed eligible if they had moderate pain and/or activity limitation, with a diagnosis of “persistent nonspecific low back pain”. Half the participants undertook tai chi exercise consisting of 18 group sessions, 40 minutes in duration over 10 weeks. The other 80 participants (control group) continued with their usual health care.

The results collected immediately after the 10 week course program indicated that there was a statistically significant treatment effect for 75% of the tai chi participants and that tai chi exercise is a safe and effective intervention for improving pain and disability outcomes for people with persistent low back pain.

This again adds to the evidence of tai chi’s health benefits when done on a regular basis and that more and more people are considering it to be worthwhile in their approach to positive health.
Please read an additional article on the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy Website regarding this study.

The Largest Tai Chi for Arthritis study has shown Significant Improvement in Pain, Stiffness and Sense of Well-being

The largest study of Tai Chi for Arthritis, by Professor Leigh Callahan from the University of North Carolina, shows significant health benefits for people with all types of arthritis. This landmark study was presented at the annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Rheumatology on 8th November 2010. 
In the study, 354 participants were randomly assigned to two groups. The Tai Chi group received 8 weeks of lessons, while the other group was a control group waiting for Tai Chi classes. It was found that there was significant pain relief, less stiffness and better ability to manage daily living.  The participants felt better about their overall wellness, as well as experiencing improved balance.

The Tai Chi intervention is based on Dr Paul Lam’s Tai Chi for Arthritis program, and instructors were trained and certified by his Master Trainers. Dr Lam’s Tai Chi for Health Institute has established a comprehensive curriculum that includes knowledge of tai chi and chronic conditions, effective teaching methods and how to stay safe. For more information about the institute: /.

Please click here to read the article about the study.

This article can also be read in Arabic
Related Articles:

Published Studies by Dr Paul Lam and Associates

Published Studies
This list included most studies with Dr Lam’s name as an author or co-author.
 
Published Studies:
1. Lam P. New horizons…developing tai chi for health care. Journal of Australian Family Physician. 1998 Jan-Feb;27(1-2):100-1.
2. Lam, P. (2004). “Tai Chi for ageing and its associated chronic conditions.” Journal of Aging and Physical Activity 12(3): 347-347.
3. Song, Lee E, Lam P, Bae S. Effects of Tai Chi exercise on pain, balance, muscle strength, and physical functioning in older women with osteoarthritis: A randomized clinical trial. Journal of Rheumatology. Sept 2003. 30:9 page 2039-2044.
4. Lam P and Stephenson A. Tai Chi for Back Pain: Rationale and Available Evidence Supporting Tai Chi as a Complementary Treatment. Journal Medical Paradigm. August 2004 page 5-12 (journal no longer in publication)
5. Orr R, Tsang T, Lam P, Comino E, Fiatarone M. Mobility Impairment in Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Care. Volume 29, Number 9, Sept 2006. page 2120-2122
6. Fransen M, Nairn L, Winstanley J, Lam P,  Edmonds J.  A Randomized Control Trial Of 200 Subjects Comparing Tai Chi, Hydrotherapy And Control, To Measure Improvement In Pain, Physical Function, Muscular Strength And Walking Capacity. Arthritis Care and Research.. Vol.57, No.3, April 15, 2007, pp407-414.
7. Tsang T, Orr R, Lam P, Comino E, Fiatarone M. Health benefits of Tai Chi for older patients with Type 2 diabetes: The “Move It for Diabetes Study” – A randomized controlled trial. Clinical Interventions in Aging 2007:2(3) 429-439
8. Paul Lam, Sarah M Dennis, Terry H Diamond, Nicholas Zwar. Improving Glycaemic and BP control in type 2 diabetes The effectiveness of Tai Chi. Australian Family Physician Vol. 37, No. 10, October 2008 P884-887
9. Lam P Tai Chi for fall prevention.  NZ Family Physician Journal.  June 2006 volume 33 number 3 page 202
10. Song, R., Lee, E. O., Lam, P., & Bae. S. C. (2007). Effects of a Sun-style Tai Chi exercise on arthritic symptoms, motivation and the performance of health behaviors in women with osteoarthritis. Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing (English), 37(2), 249-256.
11. Song, R. Lee, E. O., Bae, S. C., Ahn, Y. H., Paul Lam, Lee, I. O. (2007). Effects of Tai Chi Self-help program on glucose control, cardiovascular risks, and quality of life in type II diabetic patients. Journal of Muscle and Joint Health, 14(1), 13-25.
12. E Lee, Aeyong Eom, Rhayun Song, Young Ran Chae. Factors Influencing Quality of Life in Patients with Gastrointestinal Neoplasms. Journal Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing . 2008 ISSN 1598-2874 Vol(Ed.) 38(5)
13. M Lee, Paul Lam, E Ernst. Effectiveness of tai chi for Parkinson’s disease: A critical review. Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, Pages 589-594, ISSN 1353-8020, Vol(Ed.) 14(8, 2008)
14. Ching-Huey Chen, Miaofen Yen, Susan Fetzer, Li-Hua Lo, Paul Lam. Asian Nursing Research December 2008 Vol 2 No 4, The Effects of Tai Chi Exercise on Elders with Osteoarthritis: A Longitudinal Study.
 15. Myeong Soo Lee, Paul Lam, Edzard Ernst; A critical review: Effectiveness of tai chi for Parkinson’s disease. Parkinsonism & Related Disorders; December 2008; Vol. 14, Issue 8, Pages 589-594.
16. Song, R., Lee, E. O., Lam, P., Bae, S. C. (2009). Effects of Tai Chi or Self-help Program on Balance, Flexibility, Oxygen Consumption, and Muscle Strength in Women with Osteoarthritis. Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamental Nursing, 16(1), 30-38.
17. Song, R․, Eom, A., Lee, E. O., Lam, P․ & Bae, S-C. (2009).  Effects of Tai Chi combined with Self-help Program on Arthritic Symptoms and Fear of Falling in Women with Osteoarthritis.  Journal of Muscle and Joint Health, 16(1), 46-54.
18. Amanda M Hall, Chris G Maher, Jane Latimer, Manuela L Ferreira and Paul Lam. A randomized controlled trial of tai chi for long-term low back pain (TAI CHI): Study rationale, design, and methods. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 2009, 10:55 (28 May 2009).
19. Eun Ok Lee, Young Ran Chae, Rhayun Song, Aeyong Eom, Paul Lam, and Margaret Heitkemper. Feasibility and Effects of a Tai Chi Self-Help Education Program for Korean Gastric Cancer Survivors, Oncology Nursing Forum • Vol. 37, No. 1, January 2010
20. Rhayun Song, Beverly L. Roberts, Eun-Ok Lee, Paul Lam, Sang-Cheol Bae. A Randomized Study of the Effects of T’ai Chi on Muscle Strength, Bone Mineral Density, and Fear of Falling in Women with Osteoarthritis. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Volume 16, Number 2, 2010, pp. 1–7
21. Michelle DiGiacomo, Paul Lam, Beverly L. Roberts, Tang Ching Lau, Rhayun Song, Patricia M. Davidson. Exploring the Reasons for Adherence to T’ai Chi Practice.The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. December 2010, 16(12): 1245-1246.
22. Amanda M. Hall, Chris G. Maher, Paul Lam, Manuela Ferreira, Jane Latimer. Tai Chi Exercise for Treatment of Pain and Disability in People With Persistent Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Arthritis Care & Research. Vol. 63, No. 11, November 2011, pp 1576–1583
23. Hua Ren,Veronica Collins, Sandy J. Clarke, Jin-Song Han, Paul Lam, Fiona Clay, Lara M.Williamson, K. H. Andy Choo. Epigenetic Changes in Response to Tai Chi Practice: A Pilot Investigation of DNA Methylation Marks. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Volume March 2012, Article ID 841810, 9 pages. 
 

RELATED ARTICLES:

 

Tai Chi for Arthritis Helps CVA

Dr Paul Lam

Published in Neurorehabilitation and Neuro Repair, Volume 20, Number 10, January 7 2009
 
Authors Stephanie S. Y. Au-Yeung, PhD, Christina W. Y. Hui-Chan, PhD, and Jervis C. S. Tang, MSWtai chi for people with chronic conditions in New Zealand 2008
 
All subjects were six months or more post-stroke.  Over a twelve week period a control group of 62 subjects performed general exercise, and a further 74 subjects received training in Tai Chi for Arthritis.  The subjects were tested for improved balance and reaction after six weeks, twelve weeks (conclusion of training) and eighteen weeks (six weeks post study).
 
Results showed that the tai chi group improved their reaction times on the non-affected side, and this was still noticeable six weeks after the study concluded.
 
This result supports the idea that regular practice of short-form Tai Chi for 6 to 12 weeks improves standing balance in people with chronic stroke. With its lasting effect beyond the training period, such short-form Tai Chi might be applied in community rehabilitation programs for patients who have adequate sensorimotor function and learning ability to safely participate.
 
Related Articles
 
 

Reference of the study: Fransen M, Nairn L, Winstanley J, Lam P, Edmonds J : Physical activity for osteoarthritis management: a randomized controlled clinical trial evaluating hydrotherapy or Tai chi classes Arthritis & Rheumatism (Arthritis Care & Research) April 2007, 57:3 pp 407-414.


Tai Chi for Diabetes Study by Dr Paul Lam Et Al

A Tai Chi for Diabetes Study 2008
 
 “Improving Glycaemic and BP control in type 2 diabetes –  The effectiveness of Tai Chi”
Published in the Australian Family Physician, Vol 37, Number 10, October 2008 p884-887
Authors: Lam, P., Dennis, S., Diamond, T., & Zwar, N.

 

This community based, randomised control trial assessed the effects of a modified Tai Chi program for people with poorly controlled type II diabetes. It found improvements in HbA1c (an important indicator of blood glucose level); six-meter walk test and total cholesterol in both the control and Tai Chi group. Improvements in physical and social functioning were found in the Tai Chi group. 

Fifty-three people who fulfilled the study criteria were randomly divided into a Tai Chi (28) and control group (25). The Tai Chi group were taught the specially designed Tai Chi for Diabetes program twice per week for six months. The control group were given ten weeks of free lessons after the study. At six months, improvements in HbA1c, six-meter walk test and total cholesterol were not statistically significant between the groups. However, improvements were observed in physical and social functioning in the Tai Chi group from baseline to follow up. Many people joined Tai Chi classes after the study.

The researchers believe that Tai Chi with its relatively low cost, easy accessibility and high adherence rate may be a useful part of the treatment of type II diabetes in the community. Tai Chi for Diabetes may be a useful introduction to greater physical activity. However, longer duration or increased number of Tai Chi sessions per week may be required to demonstrate statistically significant reductions in metabolic or cardiovascular parameters.

The authors gratefully acknowledge the RACGP Cardiovascular Research Grant that supported this project.
 

Tai Chi Helps Arthritis study published 2003

By: Rhayun Song, Eun-Ok Lee, Paul Lam, Sang-Cheol Ba

Published in the September 2003 issue of "The Journal of Rheumatology." (Abstract available online)

Title:
Effects of tai chi exercise on pain, balance, muscle strength, and physical functioning in older women with osteoarthritis: A randomized clinical trialTai Chi for Arthritis Instructors' training workshop in Dae Jeon, South Korea 2005

Authors:
Rhayun Song, Eun-Ok Lee, Paul Lam, Sang-Cheol Bae

Objective:
Twelve forms of Sun-style tai chi exercise have been developed specifically to reduce the pain and stiffness, and improve quality of life for people with arthritis. This randomized study examined the changes in pain, stiffness and physical functions (ability to do daily tasks) in older women with osteoarthritis (OA) at the completion of a 12-week tai chi exercise program.

Methods: 
72 patients with OA were randomly assigned into 2 groups. 22 experimental subjects and 21 controls completed pre- and post-test measures over a 12-week interval. Outcome measurements were physical symptoms and fitness, body mass index, cardiovascular functioning, and perceived difficulties in physical functioning. The independent t test was used to examine group differences.Tai Chi for Arthritis instructors' training workshop in Sydney, Australia 2006

Results: 
Compared to the control group the tai chi group had 35% less pain, 29% less stiffness, 29% more ability to perform daily tasks (like climbing stairs), as well as improved abdominal muscles and better balance. No significant group differences were found in flexibility and upper-body or knee muscle strength in the post-test scores.

Conclusion:
Older women with OA were able to safely perform the 12 forms of Sun-style tai chi exercise for 12 weeks, and this was effective in improving their symptoms, balance, and physical functioning.

Author affiliations:
Rhayun Song, RN, PhD, Associate professor, Soonchunhyang University, South Korea
Eun-Ok Lee, RN, DNS, Professor, Seoul National University, South Korea
Paul Lam, MD, Family physician, Tai Chi teacher, and conjoint lecturer, University of NSW, Australia
Sang-Cheol Bae, MD, PhD, MPH, Associate professor, The Hospital for Rheumatic Disease, Hanyang University Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea
Grant supporter: Supported by the Korea Research Foundation (Grant no. 2000-042-F00100), Seoul, Korea.

Address reprint requests to: Dr. S-C. Bae, The Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Hanyang University Medical Center, Seoul 133-792, South Korea. E-mail: scbae@hanyang.ac.kr
 
Related articles: 

 


Tai Chi for Fall Prevention study 2005

By: Dr Paul LamSummary of a published article:

"The Effects of Sun-Style Tai Chi Exercise on Physical Fitness and Fall Prevention in Fall-Prone Adults"
Published in the journal of Advanced Nursing 51(2), 150-157
by Dr Choi J.H., Moon J.S. and Song R. (2005)
TCD Template Paul 3

"As people get older they are more likely to experience falls and this can lead to some very serious health issues…Our study shows that low-intensity exercise such as Tai Chi has great potential for health promotion as it can help older people to avoid falls by developing their balance, muscle strength and confidence." says co-author Professor Rhayun Song (who is also a master trainer of the Tai Chi for Arthritis program) from the Chung Nam National University in South Korea.

A total of 68 older adults with a mean age of 77.8 year olds participated in the study. This group was divided into 29 people in the tai chi group and 30 as control. The tai chi program was the Tai Chi for Arthritis program based on Sun style. It was provided 3 times a week for 12 weeks and the subjects were tested before and after the three months for strength of the knee and ankle, flexibility and mobility, and the risk ratio of falls. The tai chi group reported significantly more confidence in falls avoidance than did the control group. It was concluded that this tai chi program can safely improve physical strength and reduce fall risk in fall-prone older adults in residential care facilities.

The study has attracted attention from the media worldwide including Fox News, Hindustan Times of India, Medical News Today of UK, and United Press. You can read more reports about it at:
http://www.seniorjournal.com/NEWS/Fitness/5-06-27TaiChi-Falls.htm
TCA Template Paul 1

The World’s Largest Fall Prevention Study 2007

Summary of "A Randomized, Controlled Trial of tai chi for the Prevention of Falls: The Central Sydney tai chi Trial"
By Dr Paul Lam
Authors of the study: Alexander Voukelatos, MA (Psychol) et al
Published on the Journal of American Geriatric Society, August 2007. 55:1185–1191, 2007
 
This largest fall prevention study in the world involved 702 people in the community. After 16 weeks of learning and practicing a Tai Chi program (80% of the participants did the Tai Chi for Arthritis program), the results showed that Tai Chi significantly reduced the number of falls. Tai Chi also significantly reduced the risk of multiple falls by approximately 70%.
 
The study concludes: "the findings from this study indicates that participation in weekly community-based tai chi classes can reduce falls in relatively healthy, community-dwelling older people. Given that the tai chi program used existing community facilities, the study suggests that tai chi is an effective and sustainable public health intervention for falls prevention for older people living in the community."
 

Congratulations to the Central Area Health Promotion Unit! This is one of the most effective works anyone can do for health promotion. And it adds to the mounting evidence of the many tai chi's health benefits.

Related articles:
 

Tai Chi for Arthritis study (same Tai Chi program) published in the Arthritis Care and Research Journal April 2007 

"The Effects of Sun-Style Tai Chi Exercise on Physical Fitness and Fall Prevention in Fall-Prone Adults"
Published in the journal of Advanced Nursing 51(2), 150-157
by Dr Choi J.H., Moon J.S. and Song R. (2005)

Effects of tai chi exercise on pain, balance, muscle strength, and physical functioning in older women with osteoarthritis: A randomized clinical trial"
Published by the Journal of Rheumatology Sept 2004

 


Tai Chi for Arthritis – Another Significant Study

A Recently Published Significant Tai Chi for Arthritis Study
By: Libby Spiers

Summary of the study ‘Physical activity for osteoarthritis management: a randomized controlled clinical trial evaluating hydrotherapy or Tai chi classes’, by Libby Spiers

Libby Spiers is a physiotherapist and warm water exercise coordinator at Arthritis Victoria.A Tai Chi for Arthritis class

A recent study published in Arthritis and Rheumatism found that both hydrotherapy and Tai Chi for Arthritis classes can provide large and sustained improvements in physical function for older, sedentary people with chronic osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee or hip.

The researchers carried out a randomised controlled trial among 152 older people with chronic OA of the hip or knee. Participants attended either Tai Chi for Arthritis classes or hydrotherapy twice per week for 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, compared with controls, the exercise group participants demonstrated significant improvements for pain and physical function scores. These improvements were maintained at 24 weeks.
 
“This study shows the health benefits of the Tai Chi for Arthritis program, these benefits don’t necesarily translate to other forms of tai chi” Dr Marlene Fransen, chief investigator of this study.
 
Related Articles
 
 

Reference of the study: Fransen M, Nairn L, Winstanley J, Lam P, Edmonds J : Physical activity for osteoarthritis management: a randomized controlled clinical trial evaluating hydrotherapy or Tai chi classes Arthritis & Rheumatism (Arthritis Care & Research) April 2007, 57:3 pp 407-414.